BIG Pots to the Rescue!

BIG Pots to the Rescue!

Weather-wise, we don’t know what we’ll get until we get it. That said, we can take steps to be prepared for the extremes. I am sure very few people wish a repeat of the weather and stresses of the Summer of 2016 – it was too dry, too hot and too extreme.
In the seven weeks plus of heat and dryness we experienced this past July and August many of our plants suffered. Plants, especially in small pots and containers, dried out several times per day and, when water restrictions came into effect, it was not possible to water them that often, even if you had the time and energy to do so.
For the future, it is practical to consider replacing small pots (less than 14” in diameter) with larger, deeper pots. BIG pots hold a lot of soil and soil holds water. It’s quite simple: large pots dry out less frequently than small pots. Plants that do not experience the extreme stress/de-stress/stress/de-stress patterns remain lush, in bloom and healthy.
Therefore, instead of three or five small pots scattered on the stairs to your front door, consider one or two large pots (18”+) at the base of the stairs. A visitor’s eye will be instantly drawn to it and it’s largesse will allow for spectacular and welcoming plant arrangements, with minimal care.
In large pots consider planting large plants such as canna lilies, elephant ears, ornamental grasses, ferns or palm plants and even dragon wing begonias, tomato plants and herbs. Large plants fill a large pot and give a lush effect for less money than one expects.
When possible, consider replacing hanging baskets with 16” + patio pots or 30” + window boxes. Plants that are “grounded” will dry out 50% less as they will not be moving around in Mother Nature’s “oven”.
Many large sized patio pots have two layers of composite material and a layer of air buffers between the two. This insulating pocket of air helps to keep the roots cool in the summer and insulated in the winter, preventing some large pots from splitting and breaking if left out 365 days. We call these double walled pots and they are excellent investments, often lasting 15 years or more without fading and cracking.
A large pot can be expensive to fill with proper Container Soil. Remembering that soil holds moisture, find a balance between using “filler” in pots and topping up with soil. If the environment is windy, add bricks or rocks to the bottom of the pot. This is also a good technique to keep pots heavy to prevent theft in a commercial or business setting. If the need to move the pots easily is priority, then use unused nursery pots flipped into the bottom of the pot or pieces of large Styrofoam. At least 50% of the large pot should be soil to make the moisture retentive soil work in your favour.

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